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Entries for 'Katherine Czaplicki'

Using Telerik Graphing in .NET: Tips and Tricks
Katherine Czaplicki

Using Telerik Graphing in .NET: Tips and Tricks

When using Telerik to graph in .NET, there are some tips and tricks to remember. Refer to Using Telerik to Create Multi-Series Plots in .NET for the basis of this blog. Populate Your Chart with Data – Series Provider In Using Telerik To Create Multi-Series Plots in .NET, you saw an example of how to add data to a chart using a series. This was easy to do, but included a lot of repetition if you needed multiple items to be plotted. To make this easier and more extensible, we c...

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Using Telerik To Create Multi-Series Plots In .NET
Katherine Czaplicki

Using Telerik To Create Multi-Series Plots In .NET

Telerik is a tool built for creating UI frameworks in a variety of platforms. I recently developed a .NET application at DMC which used Telerik’s WPF tools for graphing live data to the user interface. This blog will walk you through the creation of the graph below. Refer to Using Telerik Graphing in .NET: Tips and Tricks for more best practices.  Recommendations Start populating your graph with dummy data that you have hard coded! It will make debug...

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A Week in the Life of a DMC Engineer
Katherine Czaplicki

A Week in the Life of a DMC Engineer

DMC engineers always get the question: “What is a typical day at DMC like?” It’s a simple question, but very hard to answer because our days have the potential to be so different. One day may be spent working at a client site, and then the next day in the office working on six different active projects. Because of this, a weekly view is much more representative of what it’s like to be a DMC engineer. Behind the Scenes: December 7-11, 2015 One Week. Four...

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Building a Miniature Maglev Train
Katherine Czaplicki

Building a Miniature Maglev Train

For FedEx Day 2015, Elizabeth, Mark, Jeremy and I designed a self-propelled Maglev train. Maglev trains are currently in use in Shanghai, Japan, and South Korea, and are essentially trains suspended in the air using magnetic levitation. The trains travel along a guideway of magnets and can reach extremely high speeds due to the lack of friction. We made a miniature Maglev train by creating ‘rails’ of magnets on a long wooden board and gluing magnets to the bottom of a ti...

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