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Entries for 'Christopher Olsen'

Linq.js - JavaScript Library Spotlight
Christopher Olsen

Linq.js - JavaScript Library Spotlight

Working with and manipulating arrays has always been one of my least favorite aspects of JavaScript development. Ever since I became a professional .NET developer and C# became my language of choice, my distaste for working with arrays in JavaScript only grew stronger due to the lack of access to one of my favorite parts of the .NET Framework: LINQ. For those unfamiliar with LINQ, it's a library in the .NET Framework that allows a programmer to perform a large variety of complex oper...

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The Revit API: Creating Your First Add-In
Christopher Olsen

The Revit API: Creating Your First Add-In

Lately, I've gotten reacquainted with an old friend of mine: the Revit API. Revit is an incredible piece of architectural software from Autodesk, and one of its features is the ability to expand its functionality through the use of add-ins. Revit add-in development is now one of the many services that we're able to offer here at DMC, and I'd like to celebrate that fact by sharing an article about how to get started with Revit add-in development. First of all, this article assumes ...

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Sorting in JavaScript: Handling Google Chrome's Unstable Sort
Christopher Olsen

Sorting in JavaScript: Handling Google Chrome's Unstable Sort

(NOTE: There is sample code to go along with this article.) In web applications, a task that often needs to be performed is the sorting of arrays. If you're anything like me, you often use the Array.prototype.sort method to accomplish this task. And who could blame you? It's short, it's easy, its implementation is performant, and it works exactly the way you want it to most of the time. As you can see in the code pictured below, all we have to do is call the "sort" ...

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Querying the Active Directory
Christopher Olsen

Querying the Active Directory

While developing a .NET application, you may find that you need to access data that is stored in the Active Directory (AD). In these cases, if you’re not experienced with querying the AD, you may be tempted to create a copy of the data you need into a SQL database – however, this would amount to unnecessary data redundancy. Fortunately, pulling data from the AD and using it in your application is much easier than you might think, and allows you to maintain data integrity by keepin...

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